Interactive Map

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Legend

Sites

Warm, Sincere Friendship
Hampshire St. & N. 8th St. Quincy, Illinois 62703

Friends of Lincoln Wayside Exhibit

Quincy’s Orville H. Browning was Lincoln’s friend, advisor, and confidant.  Learn what the two men had in common and how they seemed very dissimilar.  Find out how Browning served as Lincoln’s close presidential ally, and learn more about the significant historical importance of Browning’s diary, a primary source for Lincoln scholars.

Looking for Exhibits Wayside Exhibits related to Quincy in the Lincoln Era are located at 18 sites. The exhibits provide details about Lincoln, events, local people, and environment that contributed to Lincoln's Quincy story. 

Guide to Lincoln's Quincy:  https://seequincy.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/lincoln-in-quincy_web_2016.pdf

 

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Warner's Memories
310 N. Quincy St. Clinton, Illinois 61727

8th Judicial Circuit Wayside Exhibit

Lincoln traveled the Eighth Judicial Circuit six months a year, becoming close friends with his fellow lawyers, with whom he shared, not only the courtroom, but also meals, an easy camaraderie, and often a room...

Lincoln, Judge David Davis, and Ward Hill Lamon, a Danville lawyer and a great bear of a man, were visiting one evening on the porch of the Barnett Tavern (a term used then for an inn, not a saloon) while young Vespasian "Pash" Warner listened.  Lamon suggested making  trip across the square to the grocery (then a term for a place that sold liquor, not food) to obtain some whiskey.  Davis objected, reminding Lamon that only the week before in Mr. Pulaski, Davis had found it necessary to postpone court since Lamon had been too indisposed (hungover) to argue a case the next day.  Lincoln pointed out that Davis often allowed a first offender in the courtroom a second chance and asked that he give Lamon the same consideration.  Davis relented.  Lamon returned with a pitcher of whiskey, and the three retired upstairs to Lamon's room to continue their discussions, leaving the boy behind.  Lincoln never drank but often enjoyed the company of others who did.  Lamon became one of Lincolns staunchest supporters and accompanied him as his bodyguard on his journey to Washington, D.C., when Lincoln was elected President.

Vespasian Warner, named after  Roman emperor, was a toddler when his father, Dr. John Warner, moved from Mt. Pleasant (now Farmer City) to Clinton in 1842.  To supplement his budding medical practice, Dr. Warner and his wife, with Harry P. Merriman, ran a hotel on the west side of the square.  There, the Eighth Judicial Circuit lawyers paid $1.50 for a week's food and lodging.  The doctor prospered, gave up the hotel, building the first brick residence in Clinton across the street from the Barnett Tavern, located a block south of the square.  Vespasian Warner said of this time when he was an adolescent, "Being young and curious, I would hang around the tavern in the evenings, as long as my parents would allow me to remain out of ed, to hear the judge and lawyers, great men in my eyes at the time and great later."

Looking for Lincoln wayside exhibits tell the stories of Lincoln’s life and times in Illinois.  Each wayside exhibit tells a unique Lincoln story and a local story.  Many of the waysides share little known stories about Lincoln and the individuals he interacted with.  There are over 260 Looking for Lincoln waysides in the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area.    

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Where Did Lincoln Stay
198 S. 4th St. Vandalia, Illinois 62471

Wayside Exhibit

Looking for Lincoln wayside exhibits tell the stories of Lincoln’s life and times in Illinois.  Each wayside exhibit tells a unique Lincoln story and a local story.  Many of the waysides share little known stories about Lincoln and the individuals he interacted with.  There are over 260 Looking for Lincoln waysides in the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area.    

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Where Lincoln Walked
101 N. Main St. Jonesboro, Illinois 62952

Wayside Exhibit

Founded in 1818, Jonesboro was the County Seat.  Several early politicians came from Jonesboro including Representative John Hacker, Secretary of State Alexander Field, State Treasurer Abner Field, U.S. Senator Richard Young, and Lt. Governor John Dougherty. Dougherty’s 1855 brick home still stands west of the square.

 Prosperous businesses, including the Union House Hotel operated with goods shipped along the plank road to and from Willard’s Landing on the Mississippi River. Jonesboro boasted churches, Jonesborough College, a Masonic hall, and a women’s seminary.  Two 1850’s Lutheran churches are still standing south of town.

            The day of the debate, Senator Douglas arrived by train, accompanied by the Jonesboro Band which had traveled to Cairo to meet him the previous evening, and proceeded to Jonesboro. At 2 o’clock the band marched to the fairground followed by the crowd, Douglas in a carriage, a cannon also brought from Cairo, and Lincoln walking alone with his hands behind him, his head bent forward, apparently in deep meditation.  The bandleader inquired who the tall man was-- and was told, “That is Lincoln, who has come to debate Senator Douglas!”

Looking for Lincoln wayside exhibits tell the stories of Lincoln’s life and times in Illinois.  Each wayside exhibit tells a unique Lincoln story and a local story.  Many of the waysides share little known stories about Lincoln and the individuals he interacted with.  There are over 260 Looking for Lincoln waysides in the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area.    

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Whig Rivals and Friends
500 East State Street Jacksonville, Illinois 62650

Friends of Lincoln Wayside Exhibit

In 1831 John J. Hardin moved to Jacksonville. Hardin and Lincoln served in the Black Hawk War and they both were lawyers and Whig politicians who became rivals for leadership of the party. It is said that Hardin may have saved Lincoln’s life by rushing to an island near Alton to stop a duel between Lincoln and General James Shields, at whom Lincoln poked fun in a published letter. Hardin persuaded the men to come to a compromise.

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Whiskey Mayhem
120 Springfield Street De Witt, Illinois 61735

Wayside Exhibit

Nine women from the Village of Marion (now DeWitt), joined by women from Springfield, plotted against the village saloon frequented by their menfolk.  The ladies banned together and crusaded against the "Demon Whiskey."  They stormed George Tanner's saloon, filled the whiskey barrels into the street, destroyed the kegs, and poured the vile liquid onto the ground.  In May 1854, the ladies found themselves in the DeWitt County Courthouse for "riotously, unlawfully and with force turning out, wasting and destroying ten gallons of whiskey, of the value of five dollars." They had not hired a defense attorney, but it just so happened Abraham Lincoln and John T. Stewart were present in the courtroom and offered their services...  

Lincoln grew to manhood on a frontier where whiskey was a staple and a liquid form of currency.  During his brief time operating a tavern in New Salem, Lincoln sold whiskey, among other things.  In later years, the temperance movement became a volatile political issue.  While he didn't not condemn those who drank in moderation, Lincoln himself was a teetotaler...

Looking for Lincoln wayside exhibits tell the stories of Lincoln’s life and times in Illinois.  Each wayside exhibit tells a unique Lincoln story and a local story.  Many of the waysides share little known stories about Lincoln and the individuals he interacted with.  There are over 260 Looking for Lincoln waysides in the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area.    

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William Florville
624 N. Main St. Bloomington, Illinois 61701

Wayside Exhibit

William De Fleurville, an African-American barber, owned this property during Lincoln's time. Lincoln helped de Fleurville, known as "Billy the Barber" obtain a replacement deed for this property, and he also paid the property taxes while de Fleurville was living in Springfield. IN the late 1890's, Robert Loudon, a local businessman who owned a foundry and machine shop, built these apartment flats. They have since been converted into condominium units that now go by the name "The Bloomington".

Looking for Lincoln wayside exhibits tell the stories of Lincoln’s life and times in Illinois.  Each wayside exhibit tells a unique Lincoln story and a local story.  Many of the waysides share little known stories about Lincoln and the individuals he interacted with.  There are over 260 Looking for Lincoln waysides in the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area.    

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Williams Florville's Barber Shop
623 E. Adams Street Springfield, Illinois 62701

Wayside Exhibit

View over 40 outdoor interpretive exhibits placed throughout the downtown area to experience Springfield as Abraham Lincoln knew it. Each exhibit is intended to capture a moment in time for Lincoln and how he was affected by the people, places and events he encountered in his hometown. Each story is accompanied by graphics or photographs and a medallion that is symbolic of that particular story. Visitors are encouraged to collect rubbings of each medallion.

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Winter of the Deep Snow
2600 S. Lincoln Memorial Parkway Decatur, Illinois 62522

Wayside Exhibit

The winter of 1830-31 would be one to go down in history.  The Winter of the Deep Snow blanketed Illinois to a depth of three feet on the level with drifts of four to six feet.  Storms with high winds continued for 60 days.  Many families were snowbound in their homes and travelers remained wherever they happened to be when the snow started.  Abraham Lincoln tells of spending the “celebrated ‘deep snow’ of Illinois”.

Looking for Lincoln wayside exhibits tell the stories of Lincoln’s life and times in Illinois.  Each wayside exhibit tells a unique Lincoln story and a local story.  Many of the waysides share little known stories about Lincoln and the individuals he interacted with.  There are over 260 Looking for Lincoln waysides in the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area.    

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You Can't Fool the People
East Side Sq. Clinton, Illinois 61727

Wayside Exhibit

 In the summer of 1858, Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas began to campaign for the Senate seats from Illinois that was to lead to the famous Lincoln-Douglas debates.  The Republicans' initial strategy called for Lincoln to follow Douglas around Illinois, with each candidate addressing the crowds individually...  

Posters all over DeWitt County announced that Douglas would arrive on the morning train.  A small group was present when the 5:00 A.M. train pulled in without Douglas.  A group of two or three hundred persons (two-thirds of them Republicans, a local paper noted), along with a band ready to play and with a flag to unfurl, met the 7:00 A.M. train.  However, Lincoln, not Douglas, emerged to great cheering.  Lincoln lingered on, working the growing crowd as they waited for Douglas's appearance, which did not come until 4:00 P.M.  Douglas, with our even acknowledging the crowd, went straight to a waiting carriage and drove to the fairgrounds a mile southwest of Clinton to give his speech...  

"You can fool all the people part of the time and part of the people all the time, but you can not fool all the people all the time."  Although scholars disagreed, the people of Clinton vouched for this Lincoln utterance, as did reporters from the Chicago Tribune and the Brooklyn Daily Eagle...

Looking for Lincoln wayside exhibits tell the stories of Lincoln’s life and times in Illinois.  Each wayside exhibit tells a unique Lincoln story and a local story.  Many of the waysides share little known stories about Lincoln and the individuals he interacted with.  There are over 260 Looking for Lincoln waysides in the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area.    

Explore this site.

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