Interactive Map

Our map will help you find nearby destinations, sites based on your interest, or both! Just choose the types of sites you wish to see and the area you wish to explore. Click on a site to learn more.


Legend

Sites

Lincoln Memorial
521 N. Main Street Jonesboro, Illinois 62952

Lincoln-Douglas Debate

The Lincoln Memorial is the site of the third in a series of seven Lincoln-Douglas debates.  Currently the picnic area offers three walking loops ranging from .24 - .41 miles.  Walking paths are on paved surface and surrounded with various plant and tree species.  The Lincoln Memorial pond provides great scenery for walkers and a great habitat for turtles.

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Lincoln-Douglas Debate Site
N. 5th Street Quincy, Illinois 62301

Lincoln-Douglas Debate

Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas campaigned in 1858 to become a United States Senator from Illinois. They agreed upon a series of seven debates in different parts of the state, the sixth of which was held in Quincy. The Sesquicentennial Plaza commemorates the Lincoln-Douglas Debate in Washington Park and was rededicated by the community and Quincy’s Lincoln Bicentennial Commission in 2008. 

Sesquicentennial Plaza design elements:

• A bas relief sculpture by renowned artist Lorado Taft. 

• Two Looking for Lincoln storyboards providing historical context of the debate.

• A concrete plaza featuring an 1858 map of the United States and an Illinois flag.

• A low limestone wall flanking the plaza which features six pairs of points/counterpoints from the debate.

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Lincoln-Douglas Interpretive Center
128 N. 5th Street Quincy, Illinois 62301

Lincoln-Douglas Debate Museum

The Center was an undertaking of the Looking for Lincoln Heritage Coalition and the Lincoln Bicentennial Commission. It is located across the street from the debate site and was dedicated in October 2009 as a lasting legacy to the sixth debate and to commemorate Abraham Lincoln’s place in Quincy’s history.  

A major feature of the Center, The Turning Point Exhibit, explains why the debate was so important and how it affected United States history. The eight-sided kiosk tells the story of the sixth debate and emphasizes its importance in defining the morality of slavery and catapulting Abraham Lincoln to national attention.

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Dr. Richard Eell's House
415 Jersey St. Quincy, Illinois 62301

Historic House Museum Underground Railroad

Dr. Richard Eells built this home, now located within the Downtown Quincy Historic District, in 1835.  

Eells built only the front portion of the house as it stands today, four blocks from the Mississippi River. He lived here until his death in 1848. Quincy, Illinois, was the first Underground Railroad station across the border of Missouri—a slave state. An abolitionist, Eells was actively involved in the Underground Railroad. In 1842 he was caught helping an escaped slave, Charley, from Monticello, Missouri. Charley was brought to the Eells house by a freed black, Barryman Barnett, who had spotted Charley swimming across the Mississippi River. While transporting Charley to Quincy's Mission Institute, a safer hiding place, Eells came across a posse looking for Charley. Charley fled, on Eells's advice, and was later found and returned to Missiouri. Eells returned home where he was shortly arrested and charged with harboring and secreting a fugitive slave under the Illinois Criminal Code. Judge Stephen A. Douglas heard the case in April 1843, and fined Eells $400, which he appealed.

Meanwhile, Eells became president of the Illinois Anti-Slavery Party in 1843 and was a candidate for the Liberty Party for the presidential election of 1844. He lost his appeal to the Illinois Supreme Court, the process of which drained him financially and emotionally. Eells died on a river boat on the Ohio River while on a a trip east to rest. His estate appealed his case to United States Supreme Court, which also upheld the guilt verdict. The town of Quincy is also notable as the location of the sixth Lincoln-Douglas debate of their senatorial campaign on October 13, 1858, a debate which centered on the question of expansion of slavery.

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Woodlawn Farm
1463 Gierkie Lane Jacksonville, Illinois 62650

Good for Kids Guided/Self-Guided Tours Historic House Underground Railroad

The showcase homestead of Jacksonville's extensive Underground Railroad network. Former slaves were ushered through this home on their way to freedom. This Farm, five miles east of Jacksonville, was established in 1824 by Michael Huffaker. Michael and his wife, Jane, rode by horseback from Kentucky, bought land east of Jacksonville, and built a cabin for their growing family and four cabins for free black families who helped Michael raise cattle, horses and crops. In 1840 he built the two story brick home which stands to this day on the property. Michael and his family were members of the Antioch Christian Church founded by Barton Stone.

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Lyman Trumbull House
1105 Henry Street Alton, IL 62002

Friends of Lincoln Wayside Exhibit

Former Illinois Senator Lyman Trumbull's house is now a national landmark located in Alton, Illinois. Trumbull served as a longtime senator of Illinois and a staunch Abraham Lincoln and Republican Party supporter. Trumbull authored the 13th Amendment for the U.S. Constitution which abolished slavery.

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"My Good Friend"
1000 Monroe Dr. Bloomington, Illinois 61701

Friends of Lincoln Wayside Exhibit

The beautifully restored, nineteenth-century estate tells the story of Judge David Davis, whose influence on Abraham Lincoln's legal and political career was crucial to President Lincoln's success. Lincoln often visited his friend, fellow lawyer and political advisor here at his home.

Looking for Lincoln wayside exhibits tell the stories of Lincoln’s life and times in Illinois.  Each wayside exhibit tells a unique Lincoln story and a local story.  Many of the waysides share little known stories about Lincoln and the individuals he interacted with.  There are over 260 Looking for Lincoln waysides in the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area.    

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"Wide Awakes" March in Atlanta
112 SW Arch Atlanta, Illinois 61723

Wayside Exhibit

Looking for Lincoln wayside exhibits tell the stories of Lincoln’s life and times in Illinois.  Each wayside exhibit tells a unique Lincoln story and a local story.  Many of the waysides share little known stories about Lincoln and the individuals he interacted with.  There are over 260 Looking for Lincoln waysides in the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area.    

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1858 Senate Race
NorthEast Corner of Central Park Jacksonville, Illinois 62650

Lincoln-Douglas Debate Wayside Exhibit

On Monday September 27th Lincoln arrived in Jacksonville by train from Springfield and was met by large delegations from Morgan, Cass, and Scott Counties. They moved from the depot to the square where Lincoln made one of his sixty-three speeches he had done across the state, contesting for the U.S. Senate. Lincoln was said to have spoken for two and a half hours.

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A "Favorite" Lies Here
2418 Boiling Springs Rd. Decatur, Illinois 62526

Wayside Exhibit

Looking for Lincoln wayside exhibits tell the stories of Lincoln’s life and times in Illinois.  Each wayside exhibit tells a unique Lincoln story and a local story.  Many of the waysides share little known stories about Lincoln and the individuals he interacted with.  There are over 260 Looking for Lincoln waysides in the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area.    

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