Clinton

Lincoln played an important role in the early development of Clinton, beginning in 1839 as a young lawyer with the 8th Judicial Circuit until he became the 16th President of the United States. Be sure to plan a visit to the C.H. Moore Homestead DeWitt County Museum, the mid-Victorian mansion that was home to Lincoln's Clinton law partner, the Honorable C.H. Moore. Afterwards stop by the Vespasian Warner Public Library, where you'll find some of the oldest books and manuscripts in the county – including some from Moore’s personal collection. The library also features an exhibit that tells the story of Lincoln's influence in DeWitt County. Just down the road is the historic Woodlawn Cemetery, where many of the area’s oldest citizens are buried and where local soldiers who fell during the Civil War are commemorated.

Planning an early Autumn trip? Each September, thousands of people gather in Clinton for the C.H. Moore Homestead DeWitt County Museum's annual Apple 'n Pork Festival, with lots of entertainment, great food, and more.

For more information:

Clinton Area Chamber of Commerce & Tourism Bureau
100 S. Center Street Suite 101
Clinton, IL 61727
217-935-3364
http://clintonilchamber.com/

Location

Legend

Nearby Sites

Vespasian Warner Public Library District
310 N. Quincy St. Clinton, Illinois 61727

Friends of Lincoln Museum

Vespasian Warner Public Library District maintains a large local history collection and houses the collection of the DeWitt County Genealogical Society, as well as revolving exhibits of the Lincoln Heritage Committee of DeWitt County.  Historical programs and Lincoln related presentations occur throughout the year.

 

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CH Moore Homestead DeWitt County Museum
219 E. Woodlawn St. Clinton, Illinois 61727

Friends of Lincoln Guided/Self-Guided Tours Historic House Passport Site Visitor Information

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the restored, fully-furnished mansion and spacious grounds whisk visitors back to the Victorian era.  The historic house was once home to Clinton attorney, Clifton H. Moore.  Visitors will enjoy tours of the mansion and carriage barn, view special exhibits and displays, including stories of the law partnership, political ties, and friendship shared by C.H. Moore and Abraham Lincoln during Lincoln's time in DeWitt County.  The DeWitt County Museum is also the home of the annual Apple 'n Pork Festival.

 

 

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Friends To The End
219 E. Woodlawn St. Clinton, Illinois 61727

Friends of Lincoln Wayside Exhibit

During the twenty years Abraham Lincoln attended the DeWitt County Court on the Eighth Judicial Circuit, he and Clifton H. Moore, Clinton's first resident attorney, developed a deep friendship as well as a mutual law practice.  The two men shared many similarities, each achieving his law degree through diligent independent study rather than university education.  Both had abilities for surveying land.  Lincoln used his skills in New Salem days; Moore used his knowledge in the purchase of large tracts of farmland.  Both had a great appreciation for books, Moore acquiring the largest private library in downstate Illinois.  Lincoln, also an avid reader, despite his limited one-year classroom education, had a great thirst for knowledge and often perused a book during his long, bumpy circuit rides...

The shocking and sad news of Lincoln's assassination prompted the congregation of the Clinton Presbyterian Church to hold services of mourning on April 17, 1865.  Rev. A. J. Clark gave a sermon followed by an eloquent eulogy delivered by Clinton H. Moore.  The Clinton Public reported that his speech "paid a just tribute to the noble dead, counseled moderation on the part of the people and built up the hopes of all loyal hearts."  Perhaps Moore's most meaningful statements concerning Lincoln were, "In him, next to God, we trusted.  Trusted in his honesty, that was never tarnished... trusted in his mercy .... Above all, we trusted him because he had power and had not abused it."  A steady knell of all the church bells followed their services, accentuating the grief felt by all.

Looking for Lincoln wayside exhibits tell the stories of Lincoln’s life and times in Illinois.  Each wayside exhibit tells a unique Lincoln story and a local story.  Many of the waysides share little known stories about Lincoln and the individuals he interacted with.  There are over 260 Looking for Lincoln waysides in the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area.    

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Humorous Moments
100 S. Center St. Clinton, Illinois 61727

Wayside Exhibit

One day, a farm boy sat on the rascal bench outside the Barnett Tavern.  On horseback, Lincoln approached the inn and inquired about accommodations.  A mischievous boy hurried over to kindly greet Lincoln and offered to get the innkeeper, but he warned Lincoln that the man was nearly deaf.  So, as a courtesy, Lincoln would have to speak up when he brought the innkeeper out.  When the boy returned with the proprietor, Lincoln greeted Mr. Barnett loudly.  In turn, Barnett also spoke in a loud voice, for the boy had told Barnett that Lincoln was hard of hearing.  Thus, the conversation continued until Lincoln asked Barnett why he was hollering and informed him that he was not deaf.  The innkeeper replied that he was not hard of hearing either.  It was not until then that the two men realized the boy had fooled them, and they shared a good laugh...

Wilson Allen was suing the Illinois Central Railroad for "cutting a ditch causing water to back up on Allen's (rural) property."  Lincoln was defending the railroad.  Knowing Allen was in town, Lincoln took the opportunity of Allen's absence from home and investigated.  Lincoln walked to Allen's residence and observed water being carried from the ditch and Mrs. Allen doing laundry in the same.  Lincoln then approached and asked for a drink of water, which Mrs. Allen drew from the ditch, apologizing that the well was dry...

Looking for Lincoln wayside exhibits tell the stories of Lincoln’s life and times in Illinois.  Each wayside exhibit tells a unique Lincoln story and a local story.  Many of the waysides share little known stories about Lincoln and the individuals he interacted with.  There are over 260 Looking for Lincoln waysides in the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area.    

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Lawyers and Book Lovers
310 N. Quincy St. Clinton, Illinois 61727

Wayside Exhibit

"The things I want to know are in books; my best friend is a man who'll get me a book I ain't read." said Abraham Lincoln when he was about ten years old.  Lincoln, who was known to be awkward around the gentler sex, found he was comfortable discussing books with Mary Todd, a woman also interested in the "unfeminine" world of politics...

Lincoln met a kindred soul in Clinton's first resident lawyer, C. H. Moore, a great lover of books who owned the largest private library in downstate Illinois during the nineteenth century.  Before his death, Moore commissioned an architect to draw up plans for a public library.  His son-in-law and law partner, Congressman Vespasian Warner, donated funds and land to make Moore's dream come true.  The Vespasian Warner Public Library, including the C. H. Moore Rate Book Collection, opened in 1908, and today remains the repository for more than 5,000 volumes of Moore's collection.  Among its highlights is a book bearing Lincoln's handwriting, presented to his friend C. H. Moore shortly before Lincoln left Illinois to assume the office of President...

Looking for Lincoln wayside exhibits tell the stories of Lincoln’s life and times in Illinois.  Each wayside exhibit tells a unique Lincoln story and a local story.  Many of the waysides share little known stories about Lincoln and the individuals he interacted with.  There are over 260 Looking for Lincoln waysides in the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area.    

Explore this site.

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